I am helping a friend’s daughter with her wedding planning and want to make a backdrop like this for the wedding ceremony. Can you elaborate on how the strings of lights were plugged in and whether they all “hung” versus the string light hanging down and then looping back up, if that makes sense? I like the look of them just hanging but it seems like plugging a bunch of individual ones would be hard. Am I making this too complicated?!
In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!
Breaking news: Bokeh is in! With Lastolite’s Out of Focus Backgrounds, you won’t need to fiddle with your camera’s aperture to mimic that dreamy depth of field. There are a pair of double-sided backdrops in the Out of Focus line: one features a blurred seascape/autumn foliage, and the other sports summer foliage on one side and city lights on the other. At 4 x 5 feet, these backdrops should handle close to full-length portraits and will collapse to about a third of their size for transport. They weigh in at 3.3 pounds and come with their own carrying case. 
The backdrops used for photography are usually made of lighter material which makes it easy for the photographers to carry them around while traveling. The backdrops are usually hung as panels or can be easily draped over anything to give a particular effect. They can also be suspended from background stands by using clamps. Depending upon the type of effect needed by the photographer, the type and size of backdrop can be selected from the wide variety available. Since backdrops require some support, there are many types of background supports available that are well-suited for location work, or even sophisticated permanent studios.
Everyone wants to feel special, and when you buy a Drop It Modern fabric backdrop you’ll be one of 15 photographers to gain access to that style—the company maintains a limited inventory so that each style is more exclusive. These non-reflective canvas linen fabric backdrops are sold in 54- or 98-inch widths and 108-inch lengths. Wrinkle resistant and seamless, these backdrops can be machine washed and tumbled dry on low heat. Pictured here is Sunray. 
No more wasting your money on cheap vinyl. We've got just what you're looking for in a professional fabric photo backdrop. We print on high quality, matte finish, non-glare cloth with a dye sublimation process that exceeds expectations. We even have three different fabrics to choose from, allowing for further individualization! Other companies either print on subpar materials (like vinyl, muslin, or even paper!) or they print direct to fabric, which lessens the resolution and leaves you wanting more. Here at Photo Pie, we pride ourselves on providing excellent customer service through your entire ordering process. Whether you're needing a one time backdrop for a party or needing durable, wrinkle free backdrops for your photography studio, we've got professionally sublimated backdrops just for you!
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