In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!
In this SOOC shot, you can see just how down and dirty this setup was. The backdrop is not pulled out very far and taped down only in a couple of spots. In the top left edge of the image you can see the corner of the 50 inch Apollo. This also shows that the right edge of the light is hitting the subject, allowing for a soft feathered look, but more importantly for this setup, it's allowing the rest of the box to light our background.
Any photo op is just as exciting as the party itself with our unique photo booth props. Stick props that include everything from emojis to silly monsters to zoo animals? Check. Costume accessories that you can wear and share like hats, masks and glasses? Yep, we got 'em. Novelty jewelry in every color and style? You better believe it! Set all of these fun finds out next to your DIY photo booth for guests to grab as the prepare to pose. Best of all, they double as take home party favors once the celebration wraps.
In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
Chromakey gives you the ability to insert your photography client into a background of your choosing by having them pose in front of a vibrantly colored screen. You can do this in post-processing programs by removing and replacing the chromakeyed color with the background of your choosing. While you can technically chromakey any color, opting for a very exaggerated color, neon green or blue, will reduce the chance of your client accidentally looking like a floating head without a body because you chromakeyed the color of their dress.
We offer a product range that’s unsurpassed for its variety, selection and value. From smooth Seamless Paper in every color under the sun to Floor Drops with amazingly lifelike, dimensional patterns that can create the look of location shooting in the studio, we make the products that photographers rely on for creating perfect backgrounds for virtually every situation. Just starting out and need a flexible solution for a space that does double duty? We have reversible backgrounds that are easy to set up and break down. Upgrading your high-traffic commercial studio and looking for a timeless, professional backdrop set? We have heavy-duty, durable vinyl that will stand the test of time.
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