Express your love of geology with ProStudio’s Hard Rock Poser. They may look back-breaking, but these posers are made from plastic and are hollow inside so you can move them around your studio, or to a location, with ease. (Pro tip: Pretend they’re real and lift one over your head to impress friends and clients.) The poser has a flat top and is sturdy enough for an adult to sit on. The small rock measures in at 19 x 14 x 12 inches while a large model is 27 x 21 x 25 inches. Additional sizes and rock colors are also available.

Users love the portable carrying bag, but some do note that it’s not heavy-duty or suitable for heavy fabrics. The ePhoto support stand kit is made of lightweight aluminum for portability, and you can adjust the height up to 8 ft. and the width to 10 ft. Another great thing about this product is that you can set it up in minutes, store it in the included carry bag and take it with you.


well my fault i didnt pay attention to other posted reviews that said order multiples. i only ordered one and of course it was no where near enough to do a proper back drop. so i will need to buy maybe 2 more. the picture seems a tad misleading cos it looks like just one solid panel. One Panel is the equivalent of one of my House curtains. which is where i hung this up, over my windows, to make a back drop for our New years eve family party. LOL it was real conversation piece.

As I expected with cotton it came quite wrinkled, but as any cotton the wrinkles come out well. Of course, ironing requires work and on such large piece of fabric it took about 15 minutes. Cotton will wrinkle again if it is folded for storage, so ideally it would be best to store it mounted on the stands, but for me it is not possible due to lack of space. So I expect that I will need to iron it again, but hopefully it will take less time compared to the initial ironing as I packed it less tightly. Steam ironing works best. For a large piece of fabric like this I use a separate bottle to spray mist on ... full review
I was a little thrown off that it came folded up in an envelop, as this lead to some significant "creasing". However, I just laid the material flat, rolled it up and hung it vertically so gravity would pull the creases out. After a couple of days of hanging, it is pretty much wrinkle free. I had been a little concerned about other reviewers' comments about the image quality (digital printing) on the actual backdrop, but mine is perfectly fine. Again, my only "negative" is that the backdrop appears to have a greater "floor depth" than what I currently have.
The fill light for this shoot is also a Profoto D1 1,000W strobe in a Westcott Apollo Orb, which is camera right and with the light sitting about waist height. This light is also pulled back a bit further than the main to give a wider spill. Since I am using my lights to do two jobs, lighting the subject and the background, I am not gridding and instead placing them so that one edge of the modifier is pointing towards the edge of the seamless and the other is towards the subject.
The picture posted here is definitely deceiving, but overall I am happy with the product. I don't know how the photographer edited and/or modified the print in the listing to have the "depth" of the floor like that. I have two pictures that I will submit to show what I received - these are UN-EDITED photos (not run through Photoshop, only added my name to the bottom). I ended up using a floor cloth, as you can clearly see in the image. If the photographer used a separate floor cloth to achieve the extended "brick" look, I could understand it, but as the photo stands it is very deceiving. Obviously there were some adjustments made to bring out the colors in the background too. I can easily achieve the same "rich" colors in Photoshop or some other similar photo editing program.
In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!
Look no further! This is an awesome kit. I was very impressed with the weight and quality of the hardware. The poles are thick and sturdy, and it includes a brochure with basic instructions. The set comes with multiple bags: the large primary bag that holds everything, and smaller "set" bags (two for the umbrellas/softboxes and one for the back muslin stand). Overall I am very satisfied with this purchase and highly recommend this set. Also, the seller was great with communication.
I would definitely play around with it. Your not going to want to go too wide with 4 because odds are they will move around a bit and you’ll end up with some soft faces. Some key things to remember would be try to keep their faces all on the same plane of focus, that will allow you to shoot a little wider. Generally with 4 kids I would aim to shoot around f/4 but certainly play around. At that aperture you may want to consider moving them further away from the background. Keep in mind the closer you are to them and the further away from the background they are the more bokeh you will get!

I love this backdrop for photos; I used it for my daughters pictures to use on her first birthday card. However, as other reviewers stated, getting the creases out is nearly impossible. I took another persons idea of wrapping it around a pole (one of those long, skinny paint rollers meant for painting ceilings - so very skinny). I wrapped it around the pole and used tape to hold it in place for TWO WEEKS. While it helped with the creases a little bit, they were still pretty visible. I would love to purchase more of these for future use but am hesitant; I wish the supplier would ship them rolled in tubes as opposed to folding them.
If you’d like to do a little further reading,  here are a couple of links to tutorials that I found helpful before trying this myself. Prop Insanity has a great one with pictures of their actual studio set up using this type of background and Digitial Photography School has a great article on How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images . (Bokeh being that gorgeous background blur we all love). You can also check out my Photography board on pinterest for more ideas.  If you do try this, I would LOVE to see your finished product so please come share with us on Facebook.
For a dramatic or edgy appearance, go with low-key lighting. Low-key lighting also focuses attention onto your subject by surrounding them in shadows instead of light. To do this, you want to ensure that your solid black backdrop is at least 3 stops darker than the light on your subject. With low-key lighting, you also need to ensure that none of the light from your subject is hitting your backdrop. Grids and flag are very helpful for this.
In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
We’ve warned photographers before about the very real danger (not to mention illegality) of photographing on railroad tracks. With Backdrop Outlet’s Western Steam Train backdrop, you’ll get all of the folksy wanderlust of a track shoot without the immense risk. Like other backdrops in the company’s Western collection, the Steam Train is available in sizes ranging from 5 x 6 feet to 10 x 20 feet, depending on your backdrop material. You’ll have a number of different materials to choose from, including Baby Drops, which is a heavy matte vinyl; Candy Drops, printed on a thin nylon-polyester material; and Candy Stick, a film-backed drop that can be stuck to a wall and peeled off for reuse up to 15 times. If you need something larger, the company’s Platinum is a wrinkle-free fabric that is washer- and dryer-safe.

One of the main questions are customers ask us is “what is the difference between continuous and strobe lighting?” Continuous lighting uses a constant light source to light your subject, meaning that your lights will stay on during the entirety of your photo shoot. Continuous lighting is recommended for beginners. Strobe lighting uses a flash of light at the moment your camera shutter opens to illuminate your subject. Many professionals use this type of lighting because it offers more control of the light.
A traditional backdrop support system is the most common mounting solution for photography studios. The backdrop support system consists of a 3-section cross bar and two light stands. By utilizing two of the included cross bars, the backdrop support system can mount backdrops up to 7-feet wide. By utilizing all three cross bars, this system can mount backdrops up to 10.5-feet wide. The included  stands can extend up to 12-feet high for photographing tall people, high movement, or products.
A purchaser comments that the adjustable backdrop stand is sturdy enough to do the job and that it’s easy to put it together. He adds that it’s light and easy to transport and that he highly recommends it to anyone looking for portable background stands. Another reviewer shares that he bought three adjustable support frames and that he is pleased with the construction and the stability.
We offer a product range that’s unsurpassed for its variety, selection and value. From smooth Seamless Paper in every color under the sun to Floor Drops with amazingly lifelike, dimensional patterns that can create the look of location shooting in the studio, we make the products that photographers rely on for creating perfect backgrounds for virtually every situation. Just starting out and need a flexible solution for a space that does double duty? We have reversible backgrounds that are easy to set up and break down. Upgrading your high-traffic commercial studio and looking for a timeless, professional backdrop set? We have heavy-duty, durable vinyl that will stand the test of time.
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