An additional piece to go in the kitchen! with some matching dish towels and foam dish drying mats,everything was pulled together nicely. The window in the kitchen is as big as the curtains here and when the sunlight shines in at the end of the day it looks like you are strolling through this valley, very beautiful. Wouldn't recommend this unless you have a very large window so the panels can open all the way so you can see the entire picture.
The backdrop support system typically mounts backdrops that feature a pole pocket. This pocket simply slides onto the cross bars. Backdrops without a pole pocket can also be mounted to the backdrop support system with spring clamps. Spring clamps (AKA A-Clamps) can be found at any hardware store and typically only cost a few dollars. These clamps are great to have around your studio, as they also allow you to clamp backdrops taut at the bottom to eliminate wrinkles or shadows.
This is the Meking background support system with a crossbar that telescopes from 77cm to 200cm. It can hold paper or cloth backgrounds to a maximum of almost 200cm.   Item features: Heavy duty 18mm,22mm and 25mm diameter tubes holds the heavy backdrop or drapes light background stand convenient for on-location work where portability is required The three legs spread out quickly and are freestanding Special locking system and the power clamp designed for stability and secure the backdrop usage   Item features: The lowest height of tripod: 77cm The highest height of tripod:200cm Crossbar length: 3 segments about 200cm Crossbar diameter:25mm.
I am helping a friend’s daughter with her wedding planning and want to make a backdrop like this for the wedding ceremony. Can you elaborate on how the strings of lights were plugged in and whether they all “hung” versus the string light hanging down and then looping back up, if that makes sense? I like the look of them just hanging but it seems like plugging a bunch of individual ones would be hard. Am I making this too complicated?!
Photo Floors or as we like to call them Roll Up Floors are the perfect compliment to any backdrop. Lightweight, easy to roll for storage, and very realistic.  Photography floors are made of a thick durable neoprene rubber backed material which provides an anti slip faux flooring mat.  Whether you are looking for a faux wood photography flooring or trying to bring the grass fields indoors, there are tons of options.
This project is simple and doesn’t take very long at all, maybe about an hour from start to finish. After you’re finished, you will want to roll up the fabric and lights for storage until the wedding. Consider covering it as well, to keep and dirt or dust from settling on it. We covered ours with garbage bags since black dog fur and white curtains are not exactly friends.
Don't take this review too critical to the overall worth of the product. Ultimately you pay for what you get and this is a very reasonable price for a starter home studio setup. I've been working with freelance photography for a few years now, primarily as a hobby, and decided to buy this as a portable setup I can take just about anywhere I want. Everything was functional for that purpose and works wonderfully. The light fixtures come with lights that aren't dimmable but adjustment of height and distance from the umbrella to the bulb can suffice. The carrying bag is fairly poor quality but it's kind of just a nice little extra you get with the package so I didn't take that to heart. The stand pieces, both for the backdrop and the lights, are fairly well made but if you aren't gentle they can be easily broken. As for the backdrops themselves, you get a white, black and green one; all of which are the expected colors and are decent material. However, if you intend to set these up indoors (or outdoors for that matter) be sure to have a background that is plain. These are not the thickest back drops and you can really see just about everything behind them if you aren't caring enough to have a plain backing. Overall, I am satisfied, but you shouldn't expect this to be the only kit you will ever need. Adequate for the beginner but once you really want to make a serious home studio, you will need something much more advanced.
A Computer Printed Photography Backdrop can be printed either on a canvas material, a wrinkle free material (Freedom Cloth), or even as a pop up portable backdrop (Twist Flex). Printed backdrops are available in a variety of styles and sizes. If you have any questions or need a little help choosing the perfect design for your backdrop, please don't hesitate to contact us at 1-800-844-5616.

Express your love of geology with ProStudio’s Hard Rock Poser. They may look back-breaking, but these posers are made from plastic and are hollow inside so you can move them around your studio, or to a location, with ease. (Pro tip: Pretend they’re real and lift one over your head to impress friends and clients.) The poser has a flat top and is sturdy enough for an adult to sit on. The small rock measures in at 19 x 14 x 12 inches while a large model is 27 x 21 x 25 inches. Additional sizes and rock colors are also available.


Shooting on a clean white backdrop can be one of the more complex in-studio lighting setups around. Properly exposing for full lengths while giving your models room to work can require four or more extra lights and considerable amount of setup time. While taking the time to take care of the details is important for getting the perfect image and saving yourself hours of retouching on the back end, sometimes you just want to get a nice clean background without the hours of prep.
Made from styrene, a wrinkle-free plastic, this versatile backdrop can be used as a light table, prop setup or a seamless background. Props or people on the other side of the backdrop are seen as shapes and eerie silhouettes. Placed in front of a light, it delivers a frosted glass effect. You can cut Translum with scissors, so you can whittle down a roll into any shape you desire. It’s available in three grades: lightweight, for a soft light effect with a 3/4-stop light loss, medium grade that eliminates most of the shadows and delivers a 1.5-stop light loss and a heavy grade that knocks back two stops of light (this grade is recommended for shooting tables and is cleanable). Medium and lightweight grades are sold in 60-inch x 18-foot rolls while the heavyweight grade is available in 54-inch x 18-foot rolls.
When I want new portraits of my kids, I never head to the photography studio. Instead, I head to the kitchen or front room, where I get great window light. I’m willing to spend a lot more time than most photographers would with my kids to get just the photo I want, and I often photograph them right in front of a blank wall for an easy background. This can get old pretty quickly, though, so I’ve collected 20 different options for easy DIY backdrops you can use in your home.
You don’t have to browse Instagram long before you see images of people in dangerous places. You can satisfy the thrill-seeking selfie shooter with PhotoPie’s vertigo-inducing Bird’s Eye View floor mat. The bottom is made of non-slip rubber that will stay in place once it’s on the floor. The top material is felt and is imaged using a fade-resistant dye-sublimation process. Sizes range from 4 x 5 to 8 x 10 feet. 
There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.
In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!

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