This project is simple and doesn’t take very long at all, maybe about an hour from start to finish. After you’re finished, you will want to roll up the fabric and lights for storage until the wedding. Consider covering it as well, to keep and dirt or dust from settling on it. We covered ours with garbage bags since black dog fur and white curtains are not exactly friends.
The backdrops used for photography are usually made of lighter material which makes it easy for the photographers to carry them around while traveling. The backdrops are usually hung as panels or can be easily draped over anything to give a particular effect. They can also be suspended from background stands by using clamps. Depending upon the type of effect needed by the photographer, the type and size of backdrop can be selected from the wide variety available. Since backdrops require some support, there are many types of background supports available that are well-suited for location work, or even sophisticated permanent studios.
When I received this it was folded down to 1'x6" package. After unfolding it, every fold line is very visible. Also the interior lights on top are part of the drop. This is an old time type of backdrop that depicts like a French street in late 1800 to early 1900 why there is a interior ceiling with lights on the top of this backdrop is in my opinion stupid. Also the seams should have been glued in a downward overlay application. Instead they are in a upward application which makes the top of the seam fold down exposing the white backside of the drop. Avoid. And by something that is actually cloth and not vinyl.
Love this! I am an armature photographer and have only used a few vinyl backdrops in the past. I needed a solid grey backdrop and thought I would try one of these because they are so much cheaper than the vinyl I had purchased in the past. It was super easy to use. I do just natural lighting so it was nice to not have to deal with a glare like I do on my vinyl ones. I also loved that it was so easy to set up and take down. I had read reviews that said collapsing it back up is difficult but I had a friend with me when using it and I asked her to hold one end and it literally took me less than 30 seconds on the first try...maybe we just got lucky? I wish they had more ... full review
I ordered this backdrop, because I've been recently getting into some basic photography and needed a backdrop in a standard, simple color. Please note that included with your purchase is ONLY the backdrop and clamps for it. The stand is sold separately. It came shipped to me in a smaller flat box. The backdrop itself was wrapped in a cellophane bag inside the box. The five spring clamps were in a smaller cellophane bag inside the box as well. The clamps were very good quality-they stayed closed without any slipping. The stitching and fabric quality looked very good, especially for the price. It's not thick enough to completely block out any light behind so be prepared to plan accordingly. It is not too thin either though in my opinion. The thinner material makes for easier storage. And yes it does have wrinkles when you unfold it, but that is easy ... full review
6× Photo Studio Light Photography Background Clips Backdrop Clamps Peg Package Contents: 6 clamps Description: These Set of 6 Universal Pro Clamps are easy to use and would be a great addition to your studio. These clamps are extremely useful in positioning or stretching your background onto backdrop support systems. Clamps are perfect when you need to attach any kind of fabric background to a support system. They work perfectly for Muslin, paper, and even canvas backdrops. These clamps are also known as spring clamps, A-clamps, and even studio tongs.

Easy to use and looks good in portraits. I used a stand by Fancierstudio and clips by LimoStudio and got this backdrop set up nicely. It's plenty long, and looks like you could cut it up and use it to cover a larger area, however I wish it were wider. It's just barely wide enough for a good portrait, but not any wider. It looks good if you put your subject a foot or so in front of it with a large aperture and get some bokeh on it.


In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!


This is a durable and well made photography back drop. All stitching is tight with no loose threads. It includes 5 spring clamps for hanging, or it can be hung using the sewn in rod pockets. It's made of 100% cotton and is a nice weight without being too heavy. Overall I'm very happy with this backdrop and recommend it to anyone looking for a nice white one.
This is an 10ft*10 ft (300cm*300cm) spring backdrop with general appearance of a picture, there is a floor for person to stand on, and not seamless, mean it's two pieces backdrops. Backgrounds are suitable for Wedding, Children Photography, Holiday Party, Birthday or Photo Booths etc. If you need size that larger than 150 cm*200 cm, please contact us and additional charges is needed, also large size backgrounds have seams, please don't worry because the seam will not interfere with the photos. For any questions and problems please feel free to contact with me, I will do my best to answer and help you.
The Little Studio System is a must-have backdrop solution for photographing newborns, infants, toddlers, pets, and products.  The Little Studio is essentially a 3.5 x 3.5 x 3.5-foot room in a box. This system is completely collapsible and can be paired with hundreds of available backdrops and floordrops. These backdrops attach to the system with Velcro, allowing for instant set changes and clean up.
When it comes to studio photography, various kinds of accessories can be used to help you get the most of your pictures including backgrounds, copystands, copylights, rail systems and much more. Although the camera is the most important tool used to capture images, a nice backdrop can make the difference between a drab photo and a spectacular portrait. Unique photo offers a variety of different backdrops and background accessories from simple seamless backdrops to intricately painted canvas.

What can I say? This background is flimsy and cheap and you can see right through it and it's packed folded and the creases never come out. It arrived with a few runs which is frustrating but you get what you pay for. All of that being said, under the right conditions the backdrop does photograph well, if you know what your doing. Shallow DOF and creative lighting and it did what it was needed for, which in my case was a quick set up for a baby holiday portrait.


Love this! I am an armature photographer and have only used a few vinyl backdrops in the past. I needed a solid grey backdrop and thought I would try one of these because they are so much cheaper than the vinyl I had purchased in the past. It was super easy to use. I do just natural lighting so it was nice to not have to deal with a glare like I do on my vinyl ones. I also loved that it was so easy to set up and take down. I had read reviews that said collapsing it back up is difficult but I had a friend with me when using it and I asked her to hold one end and it literally took me less than 30 seconds on the first try...maybe we just got lucky? I wish they had more ... full review
I would definitely play around with it. Your not going to want to go too wide with 4 because odds are they will move around a bit and you’ll end up with some soft faces. Some key things to remember would be try to keep their faces all on the same plane of focus, that will allow you to shoot a little wider. Generally with 4 kids I would aim to shoot around f/4 but certainly play around. At that aperture you may want to consider moving them further away from the background. Keep in mind the closer you are to them and the further away from the background they are the more bokeh you will get!
I would definitely play around with it. Your not going to want to go too wide with 4 because odds are they will move around a bit and you’ll end up with some soft faces. Some key things to remember would be try to keep their faces all on the same plane of focus, that will allow you to shoot a little wider. Generally with 4 kids I would aim to shoot around f/4 but certainly play around. At that aperture you may want to consider moving them further away from the background. Keep in mind the closer you are to them and the further away from the background they are the more bokeh you will get!
What this tells us is that the further away the light source is from the subject and backdrop, the more likely we are to get an equal exposure from one to the other. The quality of the light source can also change with distance. You will notice that as the light gets further away it becomes a harder light with less transitional values. Also, if the subject appears to be further away from the backdrop in the last image, it's due to me needing to use a shorter focal length (zoom out) to avoid getting the softbox in the shot. The shorter focal length exaggerates perspective.
I am helping a friend’s daughter with her wedding planning and want to make a backdrop like this for the wedding ceremony. Can you elaborate on how the strings of lights were plugged in and whether they all “hung” versus the string light hanging down and then looping back up, if that makes sense? I like the look of them just hanging but it seems like plugging a bunch of individual ones would be hard. Am I making this too complicated?!
If you do many in-studio portrait sessions, you probably have a lot of space set aside for background materials, props, and supports. Add to your stash with canvas backdrops for photography, and selections made of durable, low-maintenance materials, such as cotton and wrinkle-resistant polyester. Several backgrounds come on rolls so you can mount them to autopoles and smoothly swap out designs between poses. Seamless paper works particularly well for everyday needs, as you can roll sheets out to the desired length and then reuse or trim away pieces for easy recycling. Muslin photo and video backdrops feature non-reflective surfaces that diffuse light more naturally, which can help keep the focus on your subject. If you prefer materials that allow for fast and efficient cleanup, vinyl and PVC backgrounds are a solid choice, especially when you use them in potentially messy situations involving pets, babies, and toddlers.
×