In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
Nice strong clamp. Seems well made for an inexpensive gadget. Very handy addition to the things you can mount a camera to when either you don't have a tripod or the tripod just won't work. I have not tried it with the SLR but should hold well unless the camera is quite large or with a long heavy lens. Probably best with P&S or the smaller SLR & lenses.
The type of material that you choose for photo backdrops can impact the photos that you take in several ways. Materials such as cotton, muslin, or canvas, may absorb and soften your studio lighting whereas materials such as vinyl, polyester, and velvet may reflect some of your studio lighting in your photos. Different situations will call for different photo material options, so it's a good idea to have a range of colors and prints in different material types. Many of these materials are available in this eBay category. Other photo background materials may include:

This was a great value for the price. The backdrops photograph well, the lights are great and the stand is good. The stand didn't come with instructions to put it together, but wasn't too difficult to figure out. The backdrops did come with some wrinkles from being folded for shipping, but I have them rolled up together on a wrapping paper roll and they seem to be much better (and I haven't even ironed them yet.) I would recommend this product, especially for beginners like myself.
Browse our collection of photography props including posing stools, steps for seated and standing shots, numbers, and more. These photography props are also ideal for theatre productions, catalog shoots, school portraits and more. With multiple options available, you are sure to find the photography props you need at the low prices you want. Interested in learning more about photography props? Check out What Posing Props Can Do For Your Photo Shoot!
I just got this today and attached it to my back drop stand using A Clamps across the top. There are some crease marks where it was folded so I will try various tricks I found on the internet to get them out, hopefully, without melting or ruining it. I didn't give it 5 stars because it is a little small at 5'x7' for anything but a seated subject. That's not the sellers fault as it clearly states 5'x7' but I would definitely recommend it if it were 6'x9' or larger. Even with the folded creases, it works well out of the box.
Arrived damaged with small holes from the folds but I thought I could work with it. It is not wide enough for full frame, edged in white and printed so poorly that the design looks like it has a flaw. Look carefully at the seller's images. Several are photoshopped to appear better than the product. The last shot the seller uses shows a huge printing flaw. From a design standpoint, this makes no sense whatsoever to blow out that area with white. It isn't simulated light to give depth, it's just a flaw from the printer. Really, really bad photoshop to begin with in the first place, with other areas showing white artifacts on the design. China quality and standards. Not recommended unless you can shoot around them or photoshop them out later.
In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!
I shoot videos and portraits of classical and acoustic guitarists and have a small collection of backdrops I carry around. The StudioPRO 5' x 7' Blue Collapsible Twist Muslin is one of my favorites: convenient to transport, fast to set up and easy on the eye. It's a blue muslin marbled with random patches of white and darker grayish blues, almost resembling the sky with popcorn clouds. I love how it photographs and my sample is a little darker and more attractive and than the product photos.
Display your photographic backdrops, floors, and floordrops using durable support equipment and accessories. You'll find a variety of stands and support kits that come with everything you need for mobile photography projects and studio setups. Many styles feature telescoping crossbars and adjustable bases to suit a variety of image heights and widths. Some support systems also feature multicolored chains so you can easily select the right background for your needs.
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