If you’d like to do a little further reading,  here are a couple of links to tutorials that I found helpful before trying this myself. Prop Insanity has a great one with pictures of their actual studio set up using this type of background and Digitial Photography School has a great article on How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images . (Bokeh being that gorgeous background blur we all love). You can also check out my Photography board on pinterest for more ideas.  If you do try this, I would LOVE to see your finished product so please come share with us on Facebook.
The backdrops used for photography are usually made of lighter material which makes it easy for the photographers to carry them around while traveling. The backdrops are usually hung as panels or can be easily draped over anything to give a particular effect. They can also be suspended from background stands by using clamps. Depending upon the type of effect needed by the photographer, the type and size of backdrop can be selected from the wide variety available. Since backdrops require some support, there are many types of background supports available that are well-suited for location work, or even sophisticated permanent studios.
To start constructing this DIY backdrop, measure how thick your elbow is compared to your curtain rod, and add electrical tape around the end of the rod until you have a tight fit. For most people, it will be easier to put a little bit of tape on at a time, testing the fit every so often until it’s snug, but measurements can give you a good base to start with. Don’t attach the rod to the elbow yet, however.
Though I had an idea for the DIY photo booth backdrop a long time ago, it took awhile for me and my fiance to get around to constructing it. We decided we wanted a backdrop with a sheer white curtain and bright string lights. We settled on the string lights because of their warm vibe. Plus, we thought they tied in nicely with our loosely light-themed wedding.
There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.
Any photo op is just as exciting as the party itself with our unique photo booth props. Stick props that include everything from emojis to silly monsters to zoo animals? Check. Costume accessories that you can wear and share like hats, masks and glasses? Yep, we got 'em. Novelty jewelry in every color and style? You better believe it! Set all of these fun finds out next to your DIY photo booth for guests to grab as the prepare to pose. Best of all, they double as take home party favors once the celebration wraps.
Breaking news: Bokeh is in! With Lastolite’s Out of Focus Backgrounds, you won’t need to fiddle with your camera’s aperture to mimic that dreamy depth of field. There are a pair of double-sided backdrops in the Out of Focus line: one features a blurred seascape/autumn foliage, and the other sports summer foliage on one side and city lights on the other. At 4 x 5 feet, these backdrops should handle close to full-length portraits and will collapse to about a third of their size for transport. They weigh in at 3.3 pounds and come with their own carrying case. 

Love this! I am an armature photographer and have only used a few vinyl backdrops in the past. I needed a solid grey backdrop and thought I would try one of these because they are so much cheaper than the vinyl I had purchased in the past. It was super easy to use. I do just natural lighting so it was nice to not have to deal with a glare like I do on my vinyl ones. I also loved that it was so easy to set up and take down. I had read reviews that said collapsing it back up is difficult but I had a friend with me when using it and I asked her to hold one end and it literally took me less than 30 seconds on the first try...maybe we just got lucky? I wish they had more ... full review
It may be our summer issue but winter isn’t all that far off (sorry), and with White House Custom Color’s Through the Woods backdrop, you can put your subjects in a Robert Frost-esque scene without the frostbite. Like the other backdrops in WHCC’s collection, this one is made of wrinkle-free, 100 percent polyester fabric. It’s sold in either 10 x 8-feet or 6 x 8-feet sizes.  
Any photo op is just as exciting as the party itself with our unique photo booth props. Stick props that include everything from emojis to silly monsters to zoo animals? Check. Costume accessories that you can wear and share like hats, masks and glasses? Yep, we got 'em. Novelty jewelry in every color and style? You better believe it! Set all of these fun finds out next to your DIY photo booth for guests to grab as the prepare to pose. Best of all, they double as take home party favors once the celebration wraps.
If you’d like to do a little further reading,  here are a couple of links to tutorials that I found helpful before trying this myself. Prop Insanity has a great one with pictures of their actual studio set up using this type of background and Digitial Photography School has a great article on How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images . (Bokeh being that gorgeous background blur we all love). You can also check out my Photography board on pinterest for more ideas.  If you do try this, I would LOVE to see your finished product so please come share with us on Facebook.
What this tells us is that the further away the light source is from the subject and backdrop, the more likely we are to get an equal exposure from one to the other. The quality of the light source can also change with distance. You will notice that as the light gets further away it becomes a harder light with less transitional values. Also, if the subject appears to be further away from the backdrop in the last image, it's due to me needing to use a shorter focal length (zoom out) to avoid getting the softbox in the shot. The shorter focal length exaggerates perspective.
Want to tweak one of our images? Have your own custom image you'd like to print? The possibilities are endless and our customer service department is ready to help. We print using forced perspective to help give you the most realistic image possible so that your portraits will look realistic as if you were actually on location. If you have an image that you own or have rights to, we'll help you get it formatted correctly for our printing process. Email us your artwork to start the process. If you're wanting a custom Hollywood style photo backdrop with your logo(s) repeated all over it, we do that too with one of our step and repeat backdrops!
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