I was a little thrown off that it came folded up in an envelop, as this lead to some significant "creasing". However, I just laid the material flat, rolled it up and hung it vertically so gravity would pull the creases out. After a couple of days of hanging, it is pretty much wrinkle free. I had been a little concerned about other reviewers' comments about the image quality (digital printing) on the actual backdrop, but mine is perfectly fine. Again, my only "negative" is that the backdrop appears to have a greater "floor depth" than what I currently have.
Shooting on a clean white backdrop can be one of the more complex in-studio lighting setups around. Properly exposing for full lengths while giving your models room to work can require four or more extra lights and considerable amount of setup time. While taking the time to take care of the details is important for getting the perfect image and saving yourself hours of retouching on the back end, sometimes you just want to get a nice clean background without the hours of prep.
A 5 or 6-foot wide backdrop is a great size for headshots and ¾-length portraits. These backdrops are easy to manage and still only requires minimal space to set up. These backgrounds are ideal for event photographers who often work in busy spaces or for photographers working in a small home studio. While 5 to 6-foot backdrops offer more flexibility than 3.5-foot backdrops, they still become a bit tight if when photographing a couple or full-length portrait.

In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.


Easy to use and looks good in portraits. I used a stand by Fancierstudio and clips by LimoStudio and got this backdrop set up nicely. It's plenty long, and looks like you could cut it up and use it to cover a larger area, however I wish it were wider. It's just barely wide enough for a good portrait, but not any wider. It looks good if you put your subject a foot or so in front of it with a large aperture and get some bokeh on it.
Material:Thin Vinyl plastic cloth(not washable). Features: Light absorbant Non-reflective.No pocket Type: Computer-printed for realism. For: different sizes for wedding, audlt, children, holiday party etc. Vinyl cloth backdrops is our latest and greatest computer painted wrinkle-free fleece-like fabric. This lightweight fabric will give you the intense vivid color that you have been looking for in a backdrop.

I shoot videos and portraits of classical and acoustic guitarists and have a small collection of backdrops I carry around. The StudioPRO 5' x 7' Blue Collapsible Twist Muslin is one of my favorites: convenient to transport, fast to set up and easy on the eye. It's a blue muslin marbled with random patches of white and darker grayish blues, almost resembling the sky with popcorn clouds. I love how it photographs and my sample is a little darker and more attractive and than the product photos.
The backdrop support system typically mounts backdrops that feature a pole pocket. This pocket simply slides onto the cross bars. Backdrops without a pole pocket can also be mounted to the backdrop support system with spring clamps. Spring clamps (AKA A-Clamps) can be found at any hardware store and typically only cost a few dollars. These clamps are great to have around your studio, as they also allow you to clamp backdrops taut at the bottom to eliminate wrinkles or shadows.
This was my first order with this product and I like it. The only thing that threw me off is that I expected it to be as pictured. Brick all as the 9x6 and the extra white on the bottom. It is in fact 9x6. I have included a couple test shots. The product works as expected. I love white back grounds. I think that this adds just a little bit of texture to them. Also important to not be right up against the backdrop. make sure that you get some distant between the subject and the back drop.
There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.

There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.
As with lighting systems and camera equipment, backdrops require some kind of support to keep them in place. Background supports can be simple or sophisticated systems. The simple ones are easy to set up and break down and are well suited for location work, while sophisticated, permanent studio systems can hold multiple backgrounds that can be raised or lowered either manually or at the flip of a switch.
So why only 4 stars and not 5? I personally don't like the very top of the backdrop. If you look at the pictures carefully (I don't know if you can actually see this because I tried to crop these out), it looks like there are ceiling lights on a dark alley street. Scientifically, that's impossible and realistically, it looks WEIRD. But other than that, it's near perfect for what you're paying for.
This kind of fabric has an amazing quality that absorbs light from flashes around the studio. It enables you to have a pitch-black (if using black velour) portrait background that will not reflect the light from your flash or lighting equipment. This way, you don’t have to worry about the direction of light affecting the background because it leaves no detail.
Among a raft of new products, Denny’s Fair Tale Trail puts your subject in a whimsical (dare we say Hobbit-esque) setting. The backdrop is available in your choice of three materials: Freedom Cloth, which is a wrinkle-free polyster that’s washable and dryer safe; Twist Flex, which uses the Freedom Cloth material but mounts it to a wire frame that can be folded down tight if you envision travelling a lot with the backdrop. Lastly, it’s available in canvas, which is a more delicate backdrop that ships with a wood mounting and Velcro straps. Sizes vary with Freedom Cloth, giving you the widest selection of size options.
Overall I am very happy with this purchase. I wanted to get a decent lighting studio with backdrop without dropping a lot of cash in for now. I will say when ordering it I was very hesitant. I have found things that are priced cheap,are generally cheap quality. This I think was fair. Everything was in the bag, all lights worked, no bent poles, or broken lights. The fabric of the muslin is rather thin, but I had no problem with transparency on the white. My only complaints are that the bag's strap feels very frail in the stitching where it connects to the bag, which I can easily fix with a needle and thread, and the aluminum poles for the stands/poles are very light and tip with ease. I'm sure a few sandbags hanging would fix that though. Other than that I am very happy with my purchase. I have attached a photo from a quick shoot I did to test the kit out with my oldest husky. A good product for the price, and someone wanting to keep it cheap and simple for a while.
There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.
well my fault i didnt pay attention to other posted reviews that said order multiples. i only ordered one and of course it was no where near enough to do a proper back drop. so i will need to buy maybe 2 more. the picture seems a tad misleading cos it looks like just one solid panel. One Panel is the equivalent of one of my House curtains. which is where i hung this up, over my windows, to make a back drop for our New years eve family party. LOL it was real conversation piece.
When it comes to studio photography, various kinds of accessories can be used to help you get the most of your pictures including backgrounds, copystands, copylights, rail systems and much more. Although the camera is the most important tool used to capture images, a nice backdrop can make the difference between a drab photo and a spectacular portrait. Unique photo offers a variety of different backdrops and background accessories from simple seamless backdrops to intricately painted canvas.
I was really excited to get this backdrop for my new YouTube channel (Nia Knows Best) and it did not fail. The quality is thick (which is good), and it is NOT transparent. That's perfect because I have a wall of magazine pictures behind this backdrop and yet you can't see anything but the shimmer of the rose gold glitter. The only thing I would say is that depending on the lighting the rose gold turns into a silver ish glitter which can be a little frustrating. In the last photo you can see how just because of the lighting switching, the rose gold turns into silver. Other than that it is perfect.
Cheryl Woods is an accomplished photographer, designer and branding consultant with a career spanning 20+ years. Her photographic work includes editorial, fashion, portraiture and product photography for major companies in the consumer products field including QVC and Hanover Direct. She received a B.F.A. in Photography from the University of the Arts and an M.F.A. in Media Design from Full Sail University. Cheryl's work has been exhibited at the Lowes Museum of Art in Coral Gables, FL, The New York Independent Film Festival and the Rosenwald Wolf Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Check out her website here!
The folks at the slanted lens are anything but low value so it was kinda surprising to see that many of their setups are actually low-budget DIYs. The short below shows six of those tricks including a plumbing backdrop hanger, a ton of budgety lighting solutions (some of which we have covered in the past, but their softbox is pure budget geniusity) and my favorite, another use for a tarp.
Express your love of geology with ProStudio’s Hard Rock Poser. They may look back-breaking, but these posers are made from plastic and are hollow inside so you can move them around your studio, or to a location, with ease. (Pro tip: Pretend they’re real and lift one over your head to impress friends and clients.) The poser has a flat top and is sturdy enough for an adult to sit on. The small rock measures in at 19 x 14 x 12 inches while a large model is 27 x 21 x 25 inches. Additional sizes and rock colors are also available.

Cotton is a great photo background because it works well with the subject, especially if the lighting is properly set up. Also, if you want a backdrop that’s perfect for traveling, invest in a cotton fabric backdrop. It’s portable and easy to transport, set up, and collapse. It varies in size, too, so make sure to pick the right one before going to your location.
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