Made from styrene, a wrinkle-free plastic, this versatile backdrop can be used as a light table, prop setup or a seamless background. Props or people on the other side of the backdrop are seen as shapes and eerie silhouettes. Placed in front of a light, it delivers a frosted glass effect. You can cut Translum with scissors, so you can whittle down a roll into any shape you desire. It’s available in three grades: lightweight, for a soft light effect with a 3/4-stop light loss, medium grade that eliminates most of the shadows and delivers a 1.5-stop light loss and a heavy grade that knocks back two stops of light (this grade is recommended for shooting tables and is cleanable). Medium and lightweight grades are sold in 60-inch x 18-foot rolls while the heavyweight grade is available in 54-inch x 18-foot rolls.
In summary, the key factors to getting the backdrop and subject lit in a similar exposure zone is distance; The distance of the subject to the background and the distance of the light source to the subject. Decrease the distance of the subject to background and increase the distance of the main light to the subject to make this easier. The key factor for getting a soft and directional quality to the light is also distance, but it's the opposite. By getting the light closer to the subject, we can create a softer light with more directional qualities. Also remember that these qualities of the light are relative to the size of the light source. If you are using a smaller light source, you will need to get it in closer to hold those transitional values. If you are using a larger light source, you may be able to get your light further back and still hold those soft-light qualities. Also, if the examples and basic principles here make sense to you, you have kind of just learned the inverse square law!
It was higher quality then I had expected . One side is a very soft and silky/shiny material. The photo is only on one side , just to let you know . Needs to be ironed but ours broke and we do not have an iron at the moment. If the lines were out it would look absolutely gorgeous. Totally changed the feel of a room. Bought the 60”W by 80”L . Not disappointed.
One of the main questions are customers ask us is “what is the difference between continuous and strobe lighting?” Continuous lighting uses a constant light source to light your subject, meaning that your lights will stay on during the entirety of your photo shoot. Continuous lighting is recommended for beginners. Strobe lighting uses a flash of light at the moment your camera shutter opens to illuminate your subject. Many professionals use this type of lighting because it offers more control of the light.
Cotton is a great photo background because it works well with the subject, especially if the lighting is properly set up. Also, if you want a backdrop that’s perfect for traveling, invest in a cotton fabric backdrop. It’s portable and easy to transport, set up, and collapse. It varies in size, too, so make sure to pick the right one before going to your location.

A traditional backdrop support system is the most common mounting solution for photography studios. The backdrop support system consists of a 3-section cross bar and two light stands. By utilizing two of the included cross bars, the backdrop support system can mount backdrops up to 7-feet wide. By utilizing all three cross bars, this system can mount backdrops up to 10.5-feet wide. The included  stands can extend up to 12-feet high for photographing tall people, high movement, or products.
Cheryl Woods is an accomplished photographer, designer and branding consultant with a career spanning 20+ years. Her photographic work includes editorial, fashion, portraiture and product photography for major companies in the consumer products field including QVC and Hanover Direct. She received a B.F.A. in Photography from the University of the Arts and an M.F.A. in Media Design from Full Sail University. Cheryl's work has been exhibited at the Lowes Museum of Art in Coral Gables, FL, The New York Independent Film Festival and the Rosenwald Wolf Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Check out her website here!

The main cause of this working is distance. Notice how close the subject is standing to the background and how far away the main light is from the subject. In this example, the subject is approximately 2 feet from the backdrop and the main light is approximately 4 feet from the subject. If you're new to this, I would recommend starting with your main light a bit further back to make it a little less challenging. You will see why in a second.
These are better than I expected. Good solid build. Takes about a good solid hour to assemble everything. Everything worked perfectly after assembly. No sand for the sandbag, so I put a bottle of water in the pouch. Worked perfect as a counterweight. I live in a one bedroom apartment, so I put two of the lights away after testing and keep one assembled for impulse shoots.
A user mentions that he was surprised by the quality and that he hasn’t had issues with it. He shares that he bought several to shoot pictures for his website and that it takes a couple of minutes to set them up. Another purchaser states that he would have liked if there were sandbags to keep the frame stable, but it works well nonetheless. However, one customer has noted that the stand is flimsy and that the clips are not holding the fabric well.
In this SOOC shot, you can see just how down and dirty this setup was. The backdrop is not pulled out very far and taped down only in a couple of spots. In the top left edge of the image you can see the corner of the 50 inch Apollo. This also shows that the right edge of the light is hitting the subject, allowing for a soft feathered look, but more importantly for this setup, it's allowing the rest of the box to light our background.

Backdrops tend to be at the center of your event, whether it's a photo booth backdrop, standard photography, or a tradeshow booth. They bring life, charm, and enjoyment to your subjects. With a photo booth in particular, your customers get to play. So...they're necessary. With over 500 hundred to choose from (and the option to custom-design your own), PB Backdrops has you covered.
Having skills in a variety of lighting techniques for your photo backdrop can give you some wonderful options for creating beautiful imagery for either products or portraits. By brushing up on your exposure and composition know-how along with practicing prior to your actual shoot date you’ll quickly be able to build a portfolio showing off your creative depth.
Some canvas backdrops include subtle patterns that provide an interesting but neutral background that doesn’t compete with a portrait subject for attention. Darker backgrounds can be used for low-key lighting, while a lighter, well-lit photo background can create a completely different high-key mood. Canvas backdrops at Adorama range in price from around $135.00 for a 5×7 to $270.00 for an 8×8-foot cloth.
6× Photo Studio Light Photography Background Clips Backdrop Clamps Peg Package Contents: 6 clamps Description: These Set of 6 Universal Pro Clamps are easy to use and would be a great addition to your studio. These clamps are extremely useful in positioning or stretching your background onto backdrop support systems. Clamps are perfect when you need to attach any kind of fabric background to a support system. They work perfectly for Muslin, paper, and even canvas backdrops. These clamps are also known as spring clamps, A-clamps, and even studio tongs.

I was really excited to get this backdrop for my new YouTube channel (Nia Knows Best) and it did not fail. The quality is thick (which is good), and it is NOT transparent. That's perfect because I have a wall of magazine pictures behind this backdrop and yet you can't see anything but the shimmer of the rose gold glitter. The only thing I would say is that depending on the lighting the rose gold turns into a silver ish glitter which can be a little frustrating. In the last photo you can see how just because of the lighting switching, the rose gold turns into silver. Other than that it is perfect.
If you’d like to do a little further reading,  here are a couple of links to tutorials that I found helpful before trying this myself. Prop Insanity has a great one with pictures of their actual studio set up using this type of background and Digitial Photography School has a great article on How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images . (Bokeh being that gorgeous background blur we all love). You can also check out my Photography board on pinterest for more ideas.  If you do try this, I would LOVE to see your finished product so please come share with us on Facebook.
Backgrounds, also known as backdrops, are a standard feature used in a controlled setting such as a photography studio. The ability to change backgrounds adds versatility to portraits allowing you endless possibilities in truly crafting an image. Backdrops are available in various types and are categorized based on the size and materials they are made of. These can range from simple solids to subtle patterns and even custom-painted, photo-realistic scenes. To effectively use a backdrop you will need stands and other accessories.
Some canvas backdrops include subtle patterns that provide an interesting but neutral background that doesn’t compete with a portrait subject for attention. Darker backgrounds can be used for low-key lighting, while a lighter, well-lit photo background can create a completely different high-key mood. Canvas backdrops at Adorama range in price from around $135.00 for a 5×7 to $270.00 for an 8×8-foot cloth.
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