In this SOOC shot, you can see just how down and dirty this setup was. The backdrop is not pulled out very far and taped down only in a couple of spots. In the top left edge of the image you can see the corner of the 50 inch Apollo. This also shows that the right edge of the light is hitting the subject, allowing for a soft feathered look, but more importantly for this setup, it's allowing the rest of the box to light our background.
I am helping a friend’s daughter with her wedding planning and want to make a backdrop like this for the wedding ceremony. Can you elaborate on how the strings of lights were plugged in and whether they all “hung” versus the string light hanging down and then looping back up, if that makes sense? I like the look of them just hanging but it seems like plugging a bunch of individual ones would be hard. Am I making this too complicated?!
For our session I tried to keep Mr. C about 3/4 of the way up from the lights on the wall and towards me (right around where you are seeing the garland and red ornaments in the above photo).  I was sitting only as far back from him as I had to, to get what I wanted of him in the frame (keeping in mind the three criteria above).  Using the garland and ornaments for props helped because he just played with them wherever I set them down.
Anyone that does any kind of handy work around the house (or anywhere for that matter) definitely needs to keep a few of these on hand. They are simple. They are plastic, but they feel very strong. The spring inside is REALLY strong! It's got a tight grip for sure! I have around 40-50 of these (different brands) that I've acquired over the years doing woodworking projects. These rank right up there with the best ones! If you're gluing something, these are a must to clamp the parts together. Great grip and as inexpensive as you're going to find! (currently $9.99/1.67ea). Hard to argue with that!
A good beginner, entry-level, infrequent use backdrop. If you take the time to remove the wrinkles, and there are quite a few due to shipping restrictions, it turns out to be a good first backdrop. I rolled it tightly on a 1” pvc, leaving it that way for several days, and hung it afterwards. There were a few places I needed to use a hair dryer to get them out but once done it’s a nice backdrop. It’s lightweight being vinyl but the printing on it looks much richer. For the price you know you will need to do some work but in the end it’s well worth it.

The backdrops used for photography are usually made of lighter material which makes it easy for the photographers to carry them around while traveling. The backdrops are usually hung as panels or can be easily draped over anything to give a particular effect. They can also be suspended from background stands by using clamps. Depending upon the type of effect needed by the photographer, the type and size of backdrop can be selected from the wide variety available. Since backdrops require some support, there are many types of background supports available that are well-suited for location work, or even sophisticated permanent studios.


Express your love of geology with ProStudio’s Hard Rock Poser. They may look back-breaking, but these posers are made from plastic and are hollow inside so you can move them around your studio, or to a location, with ease. (Pro tip: Pretend they’re real and lift one over your head to impress friends and clients.) The poser has a flat top and is sturdy enough for an adult to sit on. The small rock measures in at 19 x 14 x 12 inches while a large model is 27 x 21 x 25 inches. Additional sizes and rock colors are also available.

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