I just got this today and attached it to my back drop stand using A Clamps across the top. There are some crease marks where it was folded so I will try various tricks I found on the internet to get them out, hopefully, without melting or ruining it. I didn't give it 5 stars because it is a little small at 5'x7' for anything but a seated subject. That's not the sellers fault as it clearly states 5'x7' but I would definitely recommend it if it were 6'x9' or larger. Even with the folded creases, it works well out of the box.
In this SOOC shot, you can see just how down and dirty this setup was. The backdrop is not pulled out very far and taped down only in a couple of spots. In the top left edge of the image you can see the corner of the 50 inch Apollo. This also shows that the right edge of the light is hitting the subject, allowing for a soft feathered look, but more importantly for this setup, it's allowing the rest of the box to light our background.
Express your love of geology with ProStudio’s Hard Rock Poser. They may look back-breaking, but these posers are made from plastic and are hollow inside so you can move them around your studio, or to a location, with ease. (Pro tip: Pretend they’re real and lift one over your head to impress friends and clients.) The poser has a flat top and is sturdy enough for an adult to sit on. The small rock measures in at 19 x 14 x 12 inches while a large model is 27 x 21 x 25 inches. Additional sizes and rock colors are also available.

In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
Position these lights to point at the backdrop and use manual settings to achieve the “blown out highlights” effect. Make sure the light reading is at least 3 stops higher than the light on your subject. Light bounced off the blown-out background will also create a back-lighting effect on your subject, the degree of back-lighting depends on the angle at which background light are pointed at the background.
You don’t have to browse Instagram long before you see images of people in dangerous places. You can satisfy the thrill-seeking selfie shooter with PhotoPie’s vertigo-inducing Bird’s Eye View floor mat. The bottom is made of non-slip rubber that will stay in place once it’s on the floor. The top material is felt and is imaged using a fade-resistant dye-sublimation process. Sizes range from 4 x 5 to 8 x 10 feet. 
The Emart portable background support kit features adjustable crossbars, an aluminum alloy construction for portability and durability, heavy-duty spring clamps, and heavy-duty nylon sandbags. Another great thing about this product is that it comes with a bag so that you can take it with you on your trips. What’s more, you can adjust the height from 2.6 to 7 ft and the width from 5 to 10 ft.

A traditional backdrop support system is the most common mounting solution for photography studios. The backdrop support system consists of a 3-section cross bar and two light stands. By utilizing two of the included cross bars, the backdrop support system can mount backdrops up to 7-feet wide. By utilizing all three cross bars, this system can mount backdrops up to 10.5-feet wide. The included  stands can extend up to 12-feet high for photographing tall people, high movement, or products.


A 5 or 6-foot wide backdrop is a great size for headshots and ¾-length portraits. These backdrops are easy to manage and still only requires minimal space to set up. These backgrounds are ideal for event photographers who often work in busy spaces or for photographers working in a small home studio. While 5 to 6-foot backdrops offer more flexibility than 3.5-foot backdrops, they still become a bit tight if when photographing a couple or full-length portrait.

A traditional backdrop support system is the most common mounting solution for photography studios. The backdrop support system consists of a 3-section cross bar and two light stands. By utilizing two of the included cross bars, the backdrop support system can mount backdrops up to 7-feet wide. By utilizing all three cross bars, this system can mount backdrops up to 10.5-feet wide. The included  stands can extend up to 12-feet high for photographing tall people, high movement, or products.
If you do many in-studio portrait sessions, you probably have a lot of space set aside for background materials, props, and supports. Add to your stash with canvas backdrops for photography, and selections made of durable, low-maintenance materials, such as cotton and wrinkle-resistant polyester. Several backgrounds come on rolls so you can mount them to autopoles and smoothly swap out designs between poses. Seamless paper works particularly well for everyday needs, as you can roll sheets out to the desired length and then reuse or trim away pieces for easy recycling. Muslin photo and video backdrops feature non-reflective surfaces that diffuse light more naturally, which can help keep the focus on your subject. If you prefer materials that allow for fast and efficient cleanup, vinyl and PVC backgrounds are a solid choice, especially when you use them in potentially messy situations involving pets, babies, and toddlers.
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