Even shooting on location you can achieve some background lighting magic. The sun moves around throughout the day — think east to west as well as dawn to dusk. Analyze what time of the day the sun will project the light on your subject at the desired angle. Note: Hard light (direct sun) will create darker shadows while diffused light (cloudy overcast) will create softer shadows.
When I received this it was folded down to 1'x6" package. After unfolding it, every fold line is very visible. Also the interior lights on top are part of the drop. This is an old time type of backdrop that depicts like a French street in late 1800 to early 1900 why there is a interior ceiling with lights on the top of this backdrop is in my opinion stupid. Also the seams should have been glued in a downward overlay application. Instead they are in a upward application which makes the top of the seam fold down exposing the white backside of the drop. Avoid. And by something that is actually cloth and not vinyl.
Any photo op is just as exciting as the party itself with our unique photo booth props. Stick props that include everything from emojis to silly monsters to zoo animals? Check. Costume accessories that you can wear and share like hats, masks and glasses? Yep, we got 'em. Novelty jewelry in every color and style? You better believe it! Set all of these fun finds out next to your DIY photo booth for guests to grab as the prepare to pose. Best of all, they double as take home party favors once the celebration wraps.
When it comes to special effect backgrounds, the chroma key backdrops are the most common used in tandem with special effects. The chroma key or key backgrounds are usually set to perfect blue or green helping a computer differentiate the background from the subject easily. This background can be used to superimpose a second image over the first one to show the chroma key color section.
There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.
There are a few things to consider when choosing a backdrop size, including the size of your studio and the size of your subject. Portrait subjects should typically be pulled at least 3’ away from your backdrop to prevent shadows and allow for easy lighting. Of course, this distance your subject will be from the backdrop will be altered when taking overhead or backlit/high key shots. Below, we’ll discuss both the length and width restrictions of common backdrops.
A traditional backdrop support system is the most common mounting solution for photography studios. The backdrop support system consists of a 3-section cross bar and two light stands. By utilizing two of the included cross bars, the backdrop support system can mount backdrops up to 7-feet wide. By utilizing all three cross bars, this system can mount backdrops up to 10.5-feet wide. The included  stands can extend up to 12-feet high for photographing tall people, high movement, or products.

I am helping a friend’s daughter with her wedding planning and want to make a backdrop like this for the wedding ceremony. Can you elaborate on how the strings of lights were plugged in and whether they all “hung” versus the string light hanging down and then looping back up, if that makes sense? I like the look of them just hanging but it seems like plugging a bunch of individual ones would be hard. Am I making this too complicated?!
The main cause of this working is distance. Notice how close the subject is standing to the background and how far away the main light is from the subject. In this example, the subject is approximately 2 feet from the backdrop and the main light is approximately 4 feet from the subject. If you're new to this, I would recommend starting with your main light a bit further back to make it a little less challenging. You will see why in a second.
These are better than I expected. Good solid build. Takes about a good solid hour to assemble everything. Everything worked perfectly after assembly. No sand for the sandbag, so I put a bottle of water in the pouch. Worked perfect as a counterweight. I live in a one bedroom apartment, so I put two of the lights away after testing and keep one assembled for impulse shoots.
Stock up on extra drive components such as chains, switches, and weights, so you can quickly replace broken or missing parts. Be sure to keep plenty of spare clips, hooks, and brackets on hand so portrait backgrounds and video backdrops stay in place during shoots. Maintain clean and organized work spaces by storing paper rolls and mounting poles on wall-mounted and freestanding storage racks.
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