I love this backdrop for photos; I used it for my daughters pictures to use on her first birthday card. However, as other reviewers stated, getting the creases out is nearly impossible. I took another persons idea of wrapping it around a pole (one of those long, skinny paint rollers meant for painting ceilings - so very skinny). I wrapped it around the pole and used tape to hold it in place for TWO WEEKS. While it helped with the creases a little bit, they were still pretty visible. I would love to purchase more of these for future use but am hesitant; I wish the supplier would ship them rolled in tubes as opposed to folding them.
For a dramatic or edgy appearance, go with low-key lighting. Low-key lighting also focuses attention onto your subject by surrounding them in shadows instead of light. To do this, you want to ensure that your solid black backdrop is at least 3 stops darker than the light on your subject. With low-key lighting, you also need to ensure that none of the light from your subject is hitting your backdrop. Grids and flag are very helpful for this.
For our session I tried to keep Mr. C about 3/4 of the way up from the lights on the wall and towards me (right around where you are seeing the garland and red ornaments in the above photo).  I was sitting only as far back from him as I had to, to get what I wanted of him in the frame (keeping in mind the three criteria above).  Using the garland and ornaments for props helped because he just played with them wherever I set them down.
In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
This Studio portrait umbrella Kit is easy to use and setup. These lights work great with digital cameras. It is ideal for all level photographers. It is a complete kit with a complete background supporting system with case. 3 section cross bar open up to 9ft and 8ft height. THREE 6' x 9' muslin backdrop(black, white and green) and a continuous lighting umbrellas kit.
Our full line of photo props and accessories will help you create the perfect portrait. From props that interact wonderfully with subjects to those that simply give your photos a little more interest. Our props are sure to help with creating magical photographs each and every time. Our realistic prop designs are often used in theatrical settings, special events, portraits, and even the motion picture industry.
A. Regardless of the lighting system you’ve selected, you should have at least some control over the light intensity. A basic lighting system should allow you to adjust the power of the lighting to half or full. More complex systems will give you several settings options to control the intensity of the lighting. If you purchase an inexpensive lighting system, you’ll have to spend more time adjusting the physical position of the light to achieve the exact intensity of light on the subject you want.
This is my first DIY project. I decided to make this backdrop stand so when I film my YouTube videos. I bought all of the products used from my local Home Depot. I bought three 10 feet long PCV pipes. 4 end caps, 4 T-caps and 2 Elbow Caps. I had a Home Depot Employee cut the PCV pipe for me in store. The 1st PCV was cut in TWO 54 inch long pieces. The 2nd PCV pipe was cut into FOUR 30 inch long pieces. The 3rd PCV pipe was cut into FOUR 12 inch long pieces. I got this idea from Pinterest and I found it very helpful. I spent $10.23 total, including tax, and it took me less than 10 minutes to construct this project. This is great for Vlogging, low-budget photography studios or even a photo-booth at an or birthday party!
To start constructing this DIY backdrop, measure how thick your elbow is compared to your curtain rod, and add electrical tape around the end of the rod until you have a tight fit. For most people, it will be easier to put a little bit of tape on at a time, testing the fit every so often until it’s snug, but measurements can give you a good base to start with. Don’t attach the rod to the elbow yet, however.
I love this backdrop for photos; I used it for my daughters pictures to use on her first birthday card. However, as other reviewers stated, getting the creases out is nearly impossible. I took another persons idea of wrapping it around a pole (one of those long, skinny paint rollers meant for painting ceilings - so very skinny). I wrapped it around the pole and used tape to hold it in place for TWO WEEKS. While it helped with the creases a little bit, they were still pretty visible. I would love to purchase more of these for future use but am hesitant; I wish the supplier would ship them rolled in tubes as opposed to folding them.
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