The folks at the slanted lens are anything but low value so it was kinda surprising to see that many of their setups are actually low-budget DIYs. The short below shows six of those tricks including a plumbing backdrop hanger, a ton of budgety lighting solutions (some of which we have covered in the past, but their softbox is pure budget geniusity) and my favorite, another use for a tarp.

The key to getting those gorgeous big bubbles of light in the background is to locate your subject a decent distance from the lights while at the same time positioning yourself as close to your subject as you can be to get the shot you want and setting the aperture on your camera just about as wide open as you can. The further away your subject is from the lights, the closer your are to your subject and the wider the aperture…..the bigger the lights.
This kind of fabric has an amazing quality that absorbs light from flashes around the studio. It enables you to have a pitch-black (if using black velour) portrait background that will not reflect the light from your flash or lighting equipment. This way, you don’t have to worry about the direction of light affecting the background because it leaves no detail.
I just received this in the mail. It does smell a little like oil based paint, but you have to put your nose up to the fabric. The white and gray is what I ordered so alternating contrast is to be expected. First thing I did was throw it in a dryer with a wet towel to remove the creases and randomize the wrinkles. It's a backdrop of the same quality as the all black backdrop. I expect to be using it in a maternity shoot this weekend and I think it will be wonderful. What I ordered and what I expected. It isn't heavy which makes it portable for other locations, but it means it may not be what some people expect. I'm happy and looking forward to a lot of use. I think it will work for what ... full review
Even shooting on location you can achieve some background lighting magic. The sun moves around throughout the day — think east to west as well as dawn to dusk. Analyze what time of the day the sun will project the light on your subject at the desired angle. Note: Hard light (direct sun) will create darker shadows while diffused light (cloudy overcast) will create softer shadows.
I shoot videos and portraits of classical and acoustic guitarists and have a small collection of backdrops I carry around. The StudioPRO 5' x 7' Blue Collapsible Twist Muslin is one of my favorites: convenient to transport, fast to set up and easy on the eye. It's a blue muslin marbled with random patches of white and darker grayish blues, almost resembling the sky with popcorn clouds. I love how it photographs and my sample is a little darker and more attractive and than the product photos.

I love this backdrop for photos; I used it for my daughters pictures to use on her first birthday card. However, as other reviewers stated, getting the creases out is nearly impossible. I took another persons idea of wrapping it around a pole (one of those long, skinny paint rollers meant for painting ceilings - so very skinny). I wrapped it around the pole and used tape to hold it in place for TWO WEEKS. While it helped with the creases a little bit, they were still pretty visible. I would love to purchase more of these for future use but am hesitant; I wish the supplier would ship them rolled in tubes as opposed to folding them.
Any photo op is just as exciting as the party itself with our unique photo booth props. Stick props that include everything from emojis to silly monsters to zoo animals? Check. Costume accessories that you can wear and share like hats, masks and glasses? Yep, we got 'em. Novelty jewelry in every color and style? You better believe it! Set all of these fun finds out next to your DIY photo booth for guests to grab as the prepare to pose. Best of all, they double as take home party favors once the celebration wraps.
This is my first DIY project. I decided to make this backdrop stand so when I film my YouTube videos. I bought all of the products used from my local Home Depot. I bought three 10 feet long PCV pipes. 4 end caps, 4 T-caps and 2 Elbow Caps. I had a Home Depot Employee cut the PCV pipe for me in store. The 1st PCV was cut in TWO 54 inch long pieces. The 2nd PCV pipe was cut into FOUR 30 inch long pieces. The 3rd PCV pipe was cut into FOUR 12 inch long pieces. I got this idea from Pinterest and I found it very helpful. I spent $10.23 total, including tax, and it took me less than 10 minutes to construct this project. This is great for Vlogging, low-budget photography studios or even a photo-booth at an or birthday party!
The backdrop support system typically mounts backdrops that feature a pole pocket. This pocket simply slides onto the cross bars. Backdrops without a pole pocket can also be mounted to the backdrop support system with spring clamps. Spring clamps (AKA A-Clamps) can be found at any hardware store and typically only cost a few dollars. These clamps are great to have around your studio, as they also allow you to clamp backdrops taut at the bottom to eliminate wrinkles or shadows.
This was my first order with this product and I like it. The only thing that threw me off is that I expected it to be as pictured. Brick all as the 9x6 and the extra white on the bottom. It is in fact 9x6. I have included a couple test shots. The product works as expected. I love white back grounds. I think that this adds just a little bit of texture to them. Also important to not be right up against the backdrop. make sure that you get some distant between the subject and the back drop.

The fill light for this shoot is also a Profoto D1 1,000W strobe in a Westcott Apollo Orb, which is camera right and with the light sitting about waist height. This light is also pulled back a bit further than the main to give a wider spill. Since I am using my lights to do two jobs, lighting the subject and the background, I am not gridding and instead placing them so that one edge of the modifier is pointing towards the edge of the seamless and the other is towards the subject.


Get an austere rustic look with Background Town’s Wall Yellow. It’s available in two materials. NewFab is a tear resistant “paper-like” substrate that’s wrinkle resistant and won’t reflect light. It’s sold in 3.9 x 5-foot and 5 x 6.8-foot sizes. NewFab backdrops won’t come with rod pockets and aren’t machine washable. If you need a backdrop with those attributes, spring for Background Town’s UltraCloth material, a machine-washable backdrop that’s wrinkle-free and has rod pockets sewn in. It’s sold in sizes ranging from 6 x 8 to 8 x 12 feet.

I've included what the backdrop look like without people in it, and also what it looks like with several different kinds of skin tones so those of you who are thinking about buying this can take that into consideration with your potential clientele. As you can see, at least with just a horseshoe flash, people with darker skin tones definitely looked better with this backdrop.
If you do many in-studio portrait sessions, you probably have a lot of space set aside for background materials, props, and supports. Add to your stash with canvas backdrops for photography, and selections made of durable, low-maintenance materials, such as cotton and wrinkle-resistant polyester. Several backgrounds come on rolls so you can mount them to autopoles and smoothly swap out designs between poses. Seamless paper works particularly well for everyday needs, as you can roll sheets out to the desired length and then reuse or trim away pieces for easy recycling. Muslin photo and video backdrops feature non-reflective surfaces that diffuse light more naturally, which can help keep the focus on your subject. If you prefer materials that allow for fast and efficient cleanup, vinyl and PVC backgrounds are a solid choice, especially when you use them in potentially messy situations involving pets, babies, and toddlers.
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