I was a little thrown off that it came folded up in an envelop, as this lead to some significant "creasing". However, I just laid the material flat, rolled it up and hung it vertically so gravity would pull the creases out. After a couple of days of hanging, it is pretty much wrinkle free. I had been a little concerned about other reviewers' comments about the image quality (digital printing) on the actual backdrop, but mine is perfectly fine. Again, my only "negative" is that the backdrop appears to have a greater "floor depth" than what I currently have.
The main cause of this working is distance. Notice how close the subject is standing to the background and how far away the main light is from the subject. In this example, the subject is approximately 2 feet from the backdrop and the main light is approximately 4 feet from the subject. If you're new to this, I would recommend starting with your main light a bit further back to make it a little less challenging. You will see why in a second.
Everyone wants to feel special, and when you buy a Drop It Modern fabric backdrop you’ll be one of 15 photographers to gain access to that style—the company maintains a limited inventory so that each style is more exclusive. These non-reflective canvas linen fabric backdrops are sold in 54- or 98-inch widths and 108-inch lengths. Wrinkle resistant and seamless, these backdrops can be machine washed and tumbled dry on low heat. Pictured here is Sunray. 
Collapsible backgrounds are an ideal choice for photographers who need a portable, compact, and simple to set up and take down. These versatile backdrops are lightweight, easy to setup and never show creases. Collapsible backgrounds spring open, attach to stands with touch fasteners, and can be used horizontally or vertically. Portable collapsible discs are limited and available in a small range of sizes. There are some foldable disc backdrops available that extend in front of the backdrop to the floor, serving as a seamless background for full-length subjects.
Yes all the "bad" stuff they say about this product is true, it's essentially a very long roll of wrapping paper, thin, wrinkles easily. BUT that being said, if you treat it with just a little TLC this stuff performs beautifully. Photographs extremely well. Perfect for the beginner photographer on a limited budget, or like myself a more seasoned photographer with a small studio, I highly recommend this product. For the price it can't be beat! This photo was taken on the "barn wood" version.
The most simple way to hang a backdrop is by using wall hooks. This solution is suitable for people using smaller and lighter backdrops. 5 x 7-foot X-Drop Backdrops and 3.5 x 3.5-foot backdrops feature built-in grommets for use with hooks. While you can install these into your wall, we recommend picking up a pack of removable wall hooks to protect your walls. They are usually under $10 USD per pack.
In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
Easy to use and looks good in portraits. I used a stand by Fancierstudio and clips by LimoStudio and got this backdrop set up nicely. It's plenty long, and looks like you could cut it up and use it to cover a larger area, however I wish it were wider. It's just barely wide enough for a good portrait, but not any wider. It looks good if you put your subject a foot or so in front of it with a large aperture and get some bokeh on it.
These are better than I expected. Good solid build. Takes about a good solid hour to assemble everything. Everything worked perfectly after assembly. No sand for the sandbag, so I put a bottle of water in the pouch. Worked perfect as a counterweight. I live in a one bedroom apartment, so I put two of the lights away after testing and keep one assembled for impulse shoots.
If you're looking for photography lighting kits for beginners, keep an eye out on product descriptions to make sure your kit contains these two essential elements. The type of lighting kit photography you'll need will be dependent upon whether you take your photos inside or outdoors. You can find affordable photography lighting kits for beginners on eBay with many options to chose from.
For gear, I used my Canon 50mm 1.4 lens. My camera settings for most of the shots you saw were f1.8,  ISO 640 and shutter speed around 250. No flash. Just natural light. You really just need to play around with it a bit depending on your lighting situation and what not.  Be brave and use that manual mode on your camera or at least the aperture priority setting. I did test shots using stuffed toys while the little guy was napping so as not to “waste” any precious time with him and risk missing any good shots. If you have older kids that will sit still you can get some really cool shots! If only Mr. C was old enough for an M&M bribe. Mr Moose did well though…. Here’s a test shot…..
The key to getting those gorgeous big bubbles of light in the background is to locate your subject a decent distance from the lights while at the same time positioning yourself as close to your subject as you can be to get the shot you want and setting the aperture on your camera just about as wide open as you can. The further away your subject is from the lights, the closer your are to your subject and the wider the aperture…..the bigger the lights.

The idea is to hang this backdrop so that some of the floor print is actually hanging up off the floor and this works very well. The full-length photo shows this way of hanging the backdrop. However, it also works very well if you just hang the backdrop so that the brick is straight up and the floor print is on the floor. The creases from the item being folded are not avoidable, but I did not do a thing to try to remove them and, as you can see, they did not cause any problems in these photos. I am very careful to fold the backdrop when I'm done with it on exactly the same creases so as not cause any further creases or wrinkles. It's easy to do, but a large floor area is very helpful when folding. The smaller sized one might be a better option if you shooting only single subjects. I bought the LimoStudio backdrop frame LimoStudio Photo Video Studio Adjustable Muslin Background Backdrop Support System Stand & Cross Bar, AGG1111and the two together are awesome. I truly love this product!
If you’d like to do a little further reading,  here are a couple of links to tutorials that I found helpful before trying this myself. Prop Insanity has a great one with pictures of their actual studio set up using this type of background and Digitial Photography School has a great article on How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images . (Bokeh being that gorgeous background blur we all love). You can also check out my Photography board on pinterest for more ideas.  If you do try this, I would LOVE to see your finished product so please come share with us on Facebook.
Cheryl Woods is an accomplished photographer, designer and branding consultant with a career spanning 20+ years. Her photographic work includes editorial, fashion, portraiture and product photography for major companies in the consumer products field including QVC and Hanover Direct. She received a B.F.A. in Photography from the University of the Arts and an M.F.A. in Media Design from Full Sail University. Cheryl's work has been exhibited at the Lowes Museum of Art in Coral Gables, FL, The New York Independent Film Festival and the Rosenwald Wolf Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Check out her website here!

The seller describes this as “seamless”.... not even close! This is the CHEAPEST photo backdrop I’ve ever bought. It was folded in packaging in a way that there were folds every 8 x 10 inches- completely unusable. I tried to steam out the wrinkles (because this in no way is fabric- I didn’t want to risk putting it in the dryer). The steaming was unsuccessful. I tried putting it in the dryer for a minute or 2 and the wrinkles were all still there but the ink was not!
If you’d like to do a little further reading,  here are a couple of links to tutorials that I found helpful before trying this myself. Prop Insanity has a great one with pictures of their actual studio set up using this type of background and Digitial Photography School has a great article on How to Take Beautiful Bokeh Christmas Images . (Bokeh being that gorgeous background blur we all love). You can also check out my Photography board on pinterest for more ideas.  If you do try this, I would LOVE to see your finished product so please come share with us on Facebook.
Drops & Props custom work is professional, high quality, and accurate. They were responsive to our needs and hustled to complete an order that had an impossibly tight turn around time. We ordered backdrops not only for our photo booth but to have a shared experience in every Etsy office across the globe. They made this happen for us and we are so grateful.
In the shot above I used a two light setup. The main light, camera left, is a Profoto D1 1,000Ws head inside of a 50 inch Westcott Apollo Softbox. While the idea of mixing what is considered to be a high-end strobe with a budget softbox my not sit right with some, I find the indirect lighting source from a Westcott or Photek to give a really nice and even light. The 60 inch Photek Softlighter, which I also enjoy using, may only cost $95 but gives a really nice, soft, and even light. If these lower cost indirect sources are good enough for the likes of Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz, then they are good enough for me. Clay Cook did an great article on these lighting sources, "Lighting Like Leibovitz," that you can find here.
The picture posted here is definitely deceiving, but overall I am happy with the product. I don't know how the photographer edited and/or modified the print in the listing to have the "depth" of the floor like that. I have two pictures that I will submit to show what I received - these are UN-EDITED photos (not run through Photoshop, only added my name to the bottom). I ended up using a floor cloth, as you can clearly see in the image. If the photographer used a separate floor cloth to achieve the extended "brick" look, I could understand it, but as the photo stands it is very deceiving. Obviously there were some adjustments made to bring out the colors in the background too. I can easily achieve the same "rich" colors in Photoshop or some other similar photo editing program.

Overall a beautiful backdrop. More yellow than I was expecting though. The yellowish center on mine is very large and bright, with much less brown/green than the one pictured. I used it for a dance troupe portrait and the yellow wasn’t flattering with everyone’s skin tone. Too bland. However, I changed the color in post and I LOVE the result. The yellow center became a natural bright spot under whatever color I painted with, and is a lovely effect. I have included pictures. The first one is mostly unaltered in color, just darkened a little. I am keeping the backdrop, knowing that I’ll have to be careful with subject/lighting or paint it in post-processing.

Photo Floors or as we like to call them Roll Up Floors are the perfect compliment to any backdrop. Lightweight, easy to roll for storage, and very realistic.  Photography floors are made of a thick durable neoprene rubber backed material which provides an anti slip faux flooring mat.  Whether you are looking for a faux wood photography flooring or trying to bring the grass fields indoors, there are tons of options.
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