Love this! I am an armature photographer and have only used a few vinyl backdrops in the past. I needed a solid grey backdrop and thought I would try one of these because they are so much cheaper than the vinyl I had purchased in the past. It was super easy to use. I do just natural lighting so it was nice to not have to deal with a glare like I do on my vinyl ones. I also loved that it was so easy to set up and take down. I had read reviews that said collapsing it back up is difficult but I had a friend with me when using it and I asked her to hold one end and it literally took me less than 30 seconds on the first try...maybe we just got lucky? I wish they had more ... full review
The backdrops used for photography are usually made of lighter material which makes it easy for the photographers to carry them around while traveling. The backdrops are usually hung as panels or can be easily draped over anything to give a particular effect. They can also be suspended from background stands by using clamps. Depending upon the type of effect needed by the photographer, the type and size of backdrop can be selected from the wide variety available. Since backdrops require some support, there are many types of background supports available that are well-suited for location work, or even sophisticated permanent studios.
To start constructing this DIY backdrop, measure how thick your elbow is compared to your curtain rod, and add electrical tape around the end of the rod until you have a tight fit. For most people, it will be easier to put a little bit of tape on at a time, testing the fit every so often until it’s snug, but measurements can give you a good base to start with. Don’t attach the rod to the elbow yet, however.
Position these lights to point at the backdrop and use manual settings to achieve the “blown out highlights” effect. Make sure the light reading is at least 3 stops higher than the light on your subject. Light bounced off the blown-out background will also create a back-lighting effect on your subject, the degree of back-lighting depends on the angle at which background light are pointed at the background.
Backgrounds, also known as backdrops, are a standard feature used in a controlled setting such as a photography studio. The ability to change backgrounds adds versatility to portraits allowing you endless possibilities in truly crafting an image. Backdrops are available in various types and are categorized based on the size and materials they are made of. These can range from simple solids to subtle patterns and even custom-painted, photo-realistic scenes. To effectively use a backdrop you will need stands and other accessories.
When I received this it was folded down to 1'x6" package. After unfolding it, every fold line is very visible. Also the interior lights on top are part of the drop. This is an old time type of backdrop that depicts like a French street in late 1800 to early 1900 why there is a interior ceiling with lights on the top of this backdrop is in my opinion stupid. Also the seams should have been glued in a downward overlay application. Instead they are in a upward application which makes the top of the seam fold down exposing the white backside of the drop. Avoid. And by something that is actually cloth and not vinyl.

I would definitely play around with it. Your not going to want to go too wide with 4 because odds are they will move around a bit and you’ll end up with some soft faces. Some key things to remember would be try to keep their faces all on the same plane of focus, that will allow you to shoot a little wider. Generally with 4 kids I would aim to shoot around f/4 but certainly play around. At that aperture you may want to consider moving them further away from the background. Keep in mind the closer you are to them and the further away from the background they are the more bokeh you will get!
Cheryl Woods is an accomplished photographer, designer and branding consultant with a career spanning 20+ years. Her photographic work includes editorial, fashion, portraiture and product photography for major companies in the consumer products field including QVC and Hanover Direct. She received a B.F.A. in Photography from the University of the Arts and an M.F.A. in Media Design from Full Sail University. Cheryl's work has been exhibited at the Lowes Museum of Art in Coral Gables, FL, The New York Independent Film Festival and the Rosenwald Wolf Gallery in Philadelphia, PA. Check out her website here!

Muslin is a cotton weave fabric that holds dyes and paints with ease. These backgrounds are made of lightweight material and are clamped to a background stand or even draped over anything to transform the look of a picture. As the muslin is made of thinner and lighter material, it does not show wrinkles and can be used as a neutral background or as a dramatic one. It comes in many different sizes and pattern that range from 5x8 to 30x30 feet and solid color backdrop or designer series patterned design. Muslin backgrounds can feature replicas of old master paintings, abstract patterns or marbleized patterns. This material is very portable and fairly inexpensive making it a favorite with photographers.
Overall I am very happy with this purchase. I wanted to get a decent lighting studio with backdrop without dropping a lot of cash in for now. I will say when ordering it I was very hesitant. I have found things that are priced cheap,are generally cheap quality. This I think was fair. Everything was in the bag, all lights worked, no bent poles, or broken lights. The fabric of the muslin is rather thin, but I had no problem with transparency on the white. My only complaints are that the bag's strap feels very frail in the stitching where it connects to the bag, which I can easily fix with a needle and thread, and the aluminum poles for the stands/poles are very light and tip with ease. I'm sure a few sandbags hanging would fix that though. Other than that I am very happy with my purchase. I have attached a photo from a quick shoot I did to test the kit out with my oldest husky. A good product for the price, and someone wanting to keep it cheap and simple for a while.
Great for the price point! Will get lots of use out of it. Biggest issue was setting it up, theres absolutely no instructions that comes with this set. There is a piece of paper titled “instructions” BUT it’s literally just a list of what’s inside the packaging and not how to put it together. Had to watch a video online to figure it out. This was my first time setting up something like this. Also the polls are a little flimsy and I’m always worried about it falling over however again you pay what you get, don’t expect top of the line equipment when you’re purchasing relatively cheap stuff. Anyways thumbs up from me, it’s basically exactly what I needed.
The Emart portable background support kit features adjustable crossbars, an aluminum alloy construction for portability and durability, heavy-duty spring clamps, and heavy-duty nylon sandbags. Another great thing about this product is that it comes with a bag so that you can take it with you on your trips. What’s more, you can adjust the height from 2.6 to 7 ft and the width from 5 to 10 ft.
Stock up on extra drive components such as chains, switches, and weights, so you can quickly replace broken or missing parts. Be sure to keep plenty of spare clips, hooks, and brackets on hand so portrait backgrounds and video backdrops stay in place during shoots. Maintain clean and organized work spaces by storing paper rolls and mounting poles on wall-mounted and freestanding storage racks.
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